Language Arts 6 Part 2

Course Description:

Language Arts 6 Part 2 explores several types of literature written by famous, influential authors. In composition, the writing process is emphasized, while students produce their own short stories, comparison-contrast essays, and how-to essays. Proper conventions of grammar are covered. Grammar topics include nouns, pronouns, adjectives, relative and interrogative pronouns, verbs, adverbs, prepositional phrases, adjective phrases, simple sentence structure, punctuating words in a series, and understanding and using clauses.
It is recommended that students successfully complete Language Arts 6 Part 1 or equivalent course work before enrolling in this course.

Course Details:

Course Title (District): Language Arts 6 Part 2
Course Title (NCES SCED) : Language Arts (grade 6)
Course Provider : Genesee ISD
Content Provided By : Lincoln Learning Solutions
Online Instructor Provided By : Lincoln Learning Solutions
Standards Addressed : MMC
Academic Terms : Open Entry / Open Exit, Semester
NCES SCED Code :
Subject Area : English Language and Literature
Course Identifier : Language Arts (grade 6)
Course Level : (G) General or Regular
Available Credit :
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Sequence : 2 of 2

How To Enroll:

Email : [email protected]
Phone : 810.591.4401

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Additional Course Information:

Unit 1 Description

In this unit, students will learn about and read many types of nonfiction, including autobiography, biography, and informational texts. Students will review important reading strategies that will help them to understand main ideas and facts versus opinions, in order to better understand the readings. Students will also work on a research report that will be submitted for part of the Unit 1 exam.

Essential Content and Skills
The learner will:
Write definitions of the following vocabulary words: nonfiction, autobiography, biography, first-person point of view, third-person point of view, topic, main idea, facts, opinions, bias, and author’s purpose.
Identify types of nonfiction such as autobiography, biography, reference materials, newspaper articles, magazine articles, and instructional materials.
Recognize main ideas, facts, opinions, bias, and author’s purpose to better understand nonfiction texts.
Review the characteristics of a research report in preparation for writing one.
Read an autobiographical selection to analyze point of view, identify main ideas, and understand an author’s purpose.
Use a graphic organizer to begin drafting a thesis statement for the research report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: outrageous, acquaintance, precision, apt, sift.
Read a selection to recognize point of view and identify the differences between facts and opinions.
Complete an activity to demonstrate understanding of subject-verb agreement.
Use a graphic organizer to organize research notes in preparation for writing.
Review a grading rubric and Works Cited page for the research report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: infested, wily, hallucination, desperate, avenge.
Learn more about first-person and third-person points of view through reading textbook selections.
Read a selection and demonstrate comprehension of the author’s purpose by completing a graphic organizer.
Recognize run-on sentences and fragments and understand how to correct them.
Review the parts of a research report and begin drafting sections of the report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: elude, legitimate, defiant, cautiously, befriended.
Read a selection from a biography and identify details that explain the main idea.
Demonstrate understanding of irregular verbs by completing an activity and checking answers.
Write and submit a rough draft of the research report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: resembled, imagery, metaphor, simile, personification, symbols, and symbolism.
Review important literary devices as preparation for reading a nonfiction selection.
While reading “Storm,” complete a pie-chart graphic organizer to identify literary devices that demonstrate author’s purpose.
Begin revising the rough draft of a research report using teacher feedback, textbook guidelines, and a rubric.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: defy, ambitious, cautious.
Read a selection from a biography to determine and compare authors’ purposes.
While reading “Lincoln: A Photobiography,” complete a pie-chart graphic organizer to identify literary devices that demonstrate author’s purpose.
Use helpful techniques for revising the research report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: urgency and ashamed.
While reading “What Do Fish Have to Do with Anything?” complete a pie-chart graphic organizer to identify literary devices that demonstrate author’s purpose.
Continue revising the research report.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: prudent, hazardous, diligent, jubilant, resolution.
Take notes on main ideas and comprehend how to connect main ideas while reading two texts.
Continue revising and proofreading the research report by reviewing the correct uses of capitalization.
Use a graphic organizer to identify main ideas and to connect main ideas between two texts.
Compare and contrast the main ideas of two selections.
Prepare for the unit final exam by reviewing readings, vocabulary, and key concepts presented in Unit 1.
Review vocabulary terms presented in this unit to prepare for the final exam.
Review lessons presented in this unit to prepare for the final exam.
Review grammar presented in this unit to prepare for the final exam.
Evaluate the research report according to a rubric; revise and submit the report.

Unit 2 Description

In Unit 2, students will learn about and read persuasive texts. They will understand how writers use logical and emotional appeals to make arguments that persuade readers. Students will also examine how writers use various kinds of evidence, including statistics and expert quotations, to support their claims when writing persuasively. While reading several texts, including opinion pieces and advertisements, students will examine the persuasive characteristics presented in these texts. Lastly, students will be introduced to the problem-solution essay, which they will work on throughout this unit and will submit as part of the Unit 2 exam.

Essential Content and Skills
The learner will:
Write definitions of vocabulary words related to persuasive writing.
Review the characteristics of persuasive writing and the types of evidence writers use to persuade.
Read about the characteristics of a problem-solution essay.
Review the skills needed to evaluate a persuasive text.
Read a magazine article, and take notes to evaluate evidence, distinguish a writer’s conclusions, recognize facts and opinions, and make and support assertions.
Choose a topic for a problem-solution essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: dispute, isolation, declined.
While reading an article, complete a graphic organizer to identify persuasion and evaluate a writer’s conclusions.
Use a flowchart to begin drafting a problem-solution essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: criticism, circumstance, yearning.
Read an article, make assertions about the text, and identify citations to support those assertions.
Write a draft of the problem-solution essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: cooperation, conservation, confinement, pollution.
While reading an article, complete a graphic organizer to comprehend logical and emotional appeals, evaluate evidence, and identify facts and opinions.
Submit a rough draft of the problem-solution essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: engaged, nutritious, irritable.
Demonstrate understanding of persuasive techniques in a storyboard by answering questions.
Revise the problem-solution essay by comparing a draft to a model essay, by using teacher feedback and textbook techniques, and by reading the essay aloud.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: guarantee and unique.
Distinguish word connotations from denotations.
Self-question while reading an advertisement in order to examine fallacious reasoning as a persuasive technique.
Revise a problem-solution essay using a model essay and spelling tips.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: concentration, enhance, complexity.
Use a graphic organizer to identify and analyze types of propaganda in a magazine advertisement.
Continue revising a problem-solution essay with a focus on end punctuation.
Use a graphic organizer to compare messages and persuasive techniques in three persuasive texts.
Review the correct uses of capitalization while continuing to revise a problem-solution essay.
Review vocabulary terms presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Review lessons presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Evaluate the problem-solution essay according to a rubric; revise and submit the essay.

Unit 3 Description

In this unit, students will explore the elements of poetry, write a haiku, and write a descriptive essay. They will learn about many poetic devices, including imagery, figurative language, tone, and rhythm. Students will also learn important vocabulary words throughout the unit. As they read several poems, students will examine poets’ uses of sound effects, such as rhythm, meter, rhyme scheme, and repetition, in addition to uses of imagery, simile, and metaphor. Students will also be introduced to helpful tips for reading poetry, such as rereading, questioning, notating, and reading aloud.

Essential Content and Skills
The learner will:
Review sound effects used in poetry, such as rhythm, meter, rhyme, and repetition.
Review poetic devices that create imagery, such as figurative language, sensory details, metaphor, simile, and personification.
Write definitions of vocabulary words related to poetic sound and imagery.
Practice poetry-reading skills such as visualizing imagery and reading aloud.
Review the characteristics of a descriptive essay by reading the textbook and an example essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: keen, guaranteed, peculiar.
Review the uses of rhyme and rhyme scheme in poetry.
Use specific reading strategies to develop understanding of a poem.
Choose a subject for a descriptive essay.
Review repetition and hyperbole as poetic devices.
Use questioning as a comprehension strategy while reading a poem.
Organize details to include in a descriptive essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: marvel, behold, extinct.
Recognize and identify alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme while reading three poems.
Begin drafting a descriptive essay after reading a rubric and an example essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: tangles, gesture, previously.
Demonstrate understanding of elements of free verse and analyze four poems written in this form.
Complete a rough draft of the descriptive essay and submit it.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: dribble, dangled, abandoned, clutch.
Demonstrate understanding of the uses of figurative language and tone in poetry by completing an assignment.
Read three poems to develop an understanding of figurative language and tone.
Revise the descriptive essay by comparing it to a model essay, by using teacher feedback and textbook techniques, and by reading the essay aloud.
Analyze tone and how it is conveyed in poetry.
Read two poems by Langston Hughes and identify the tone of each.
Continue revising a descriptive essay.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: balmy and recall.
Demonstrate understanding of meaning in four haiku poems by completing charts and checking answers.
Demonstrate comprehension of haiku conventions by writing a haiku.
Continue revising a descriptive essay by using reader feedback and following grammar rules.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: cropped, amiably, express.
Recognize the use of metaphor and extended metaphor in poetry.
Compare and contrast two poems using a graphic organizer.
Continue revising and proofreading a descriptive essay using questions from the textbook.
Review vocabulary terms presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Review lessons presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Evaluate the descriptive essay according to a rubric; revise and submit the essay.

Unit 4 Description

In Unit 4, students will learn about the elements of drama, including plot structure, dialogue, and stage directions. They will learn skills and strategies to help them read dramas, such as visualizing, arranging events in sequence, and using prior knowledge to aid comprehension. Also, they will read several dramatic works to learn about this unique form of literature.

Essential Content and Skills
The learner will:
Write definitions of vocabulary words related to elements of drama.
Recognize strategies that further understanding when reading dramas.
Read a short play to gain understanding of elements of drama and to practice reading strategies.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: valiant, barren, flourish, apprehensively.
Analyze the use of dialogue, stage directions, and visualization in drama.
Read a play while noting details and visualizing what is happening in the play.
Identify pronouns in the nominative and objective cases.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: perplexed, indignant, arrogant, finality.
Recognize the parts of a play’s structure and the uses of suspense and foreshadowing.
Complete a graphic organizer to help with visualizing the play In the Fog.
Identify grammatical mistakes of possessive pronouns and contractions.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: coincidence, sinister, menacing, indifference.
Analyze the use of suspense and foreshadowing in dramas.
Read a play and demonstrate understanding of sequence of events by completing a worksheet.
Recognize and identify misplaced modifiers as an important grammar concept.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: surveyed, vigor, resumed, privilege.
Recognize that a text can be adapted into different versions.
Read an excerpt of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in preparation for comparing it to two adapted versions.
Review pronouns in the nominative and objective cases, possessive pronouns, contractions, and misplaced modifiers.
Gain understanding of the differences between an original work and its adaptations by reading two versions of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
Compare and contrast two versions of a text by completing a writing assignment.
Analyze and compare reading rates after reading three selections.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: fascinated, eccentric, conspicuous, persistent.
Review examples of idioms and identify their use in a reading selection.
Analyze chronological text structures while reading a brief biography of Mark Twain.
Write definitions of vocabulary words: rival, duplicate, primary, manipulate, improbable.
Review cause-and-effect text structures to increase comprehension while reading.
Use a graphic organizer to analyze causes and effects of events surrounding the famous historical radio broadcast “War of the Worlds.”
Review and practice skills for taking standardized tests.
Review vocabulary terms presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Review lessons presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Review grammar concepts presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.
Review key concepts presented in this unit to prepare for the unit exam.

INACOL Online Course Quality Standards

Academic Content Standards and Assessments Rating Comments
The goals and objectives clearly state what the participants will know or be able to do at the end of the course. The goals and objectives are measurable in multiple ways. Fully Met
The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards, Common Core curriculum, or other accepted content standards set for Advanced Placement® courses, technology, computer science, or other courses whose content is not included in the state standards. Fully Met
The course content and assignments are of sufficient rigor, depth and breadth to teach the standards being addressed. Fully Met
Information literacy and communication skills are incorporated and taught as an integral part of the curriculum. Fully Met
Multiple learning resources and materials to increase student success are available to students before the course begins. Fully Met
Course Overview and Introduction Rating Comments
Clear, complete course overview and syllabus are included in the course. Fully Met
Course requirements are consistent with course goals, are representative of the scope of the course and are clearly stated. Fully Met
Information is provided to students, parents and mentors on how to communicate with the online instructor and course provider. Fully Met
Legal and Acceptable Use Policies Rating Comments
The course reflects multi-cultural education, and the content is accurate, current and free of bias or advertising. Fully Met
Expectations for academic integrity, use of copyrighted materials, plagiarism and netiquette (Internet etiquette) regarding lesson activities, discussions, and e-mail communications are clearly stated. Fully Met
Privacy policies are clearly stated. Fully Met
Instructor Resources Rating Comments
Online instructor resources and notes are included. Fully Met
Assessment and assignment answers and explanations are included. Fully Met
Instructional and Audience Analysis Rating Comments
Course design reflects a clear understanding of all students’ needs and incorporates varied ways to learn and master the curriculum. Fully Met
Course, Unit and Lesson Design Rating Comments
The course is organized by units and lessons that fall into a logical sequence. Each unit and lesson includes an overview describing objectives, activities, assignments, assessments, and resources to provide multiple learning opportunities for students to master the content. Fully Met
Instructional Strategies and Activities Rating Comments
The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning. Fully Met
The course and course instructor provide students with multiple learning paths, based on student needs that engage students in a variety of ways. Fully Met
The course provides opportunities for students to engage in higher-order thinking, critical reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways. Fully Met
The course provides options for the instructor to adapt learning activities to accommodate students’ needs. Fully Met
Readability levels, written language assignments and mathematical requirements are appropriate for the course content and grade-level expectations. Fully Met
Communication and Interaction Rating Comments
The course design provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student interaction, including opportunities for timely and frequent feedback about student progress. Fully Met
The course design includes explicit communication/activities (both before and during the first week of the course) that confirms whether students are engaged and are progressing through the course. The instructor will follow program guidelines to address non-responsive students. Fully Met
The course provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material. Fully Met
Resources and Materials Rating Comments
Students have access to resources that enrich the course content. Fully Met
Evaluation Strategies Rating Comments
Student evaluation strategies are consistent with course goals and objectives, are representative of the scope of the course and are clearly stated. Fully Met
The course structure includes adequate and appropriate methods and procedures to assess students’ mastery of content. Fully Met
Feedback Rating Comments
Ongoing, varied, and frequent assessments are conducted throughout the course to inform instruction. Fully Met
Assessment strategies and tools make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content. Fully Met
Assessment Resources and Materials Rating Comments
Assessment materials provide the instructor with the flexibility to assess students in a variety of ways. Fully Met
Grading rubrics are provided to the instructor and may be shared with students. Fully Met
The grading policy and practices are easy to understand. Fully Met
Course Architecture Rating Comments
The course architecture permits the online instructor to add content, activities and assessments to extend learning opportunities. Fully Met
The course accommodates multiple school calendars; e.g., block, 4X4 and traditional schedules. Fully Met
User Interface Rating Comments
Clear and consistent navigation is present throughout the course. Fully Met
Rich media are provided in multiple formats for ease of use and access in order to address diverse student needs. Partially Met
Technology Requirements and Interoperability Rating Comments
All technology requirements (including hardware, browser, software, etc...) are specified. Partially Met
Prerequisite skills in the use of technology are identified. Fully Met
The course uses content-specific tools and software appropriately. Fully Met
The course is designed to meet internationally recognized interoperability standards. Fully Met
Copyright and licensing status, including permission to share where applicable, is clearly stated and easily found. Fully Met
Accessibility Rating Comments
Course materials and activities are designed to provide appropriate access to all students. The course, developed with universal design principles in mind, conforms to the U.S. Section 504 and Section 508 provisions for electronic and information technology as well as the W3C’s Web Content Accessibility guidelines (WCAg 2.0). Fully Met
Data Security Rating Comments
Student information remains confidential, as required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Fully Met
Accessing Course Effectiveness Rating Comments
The course provider uses multiple ways of assessing course effectiveness. Fully Met
The course is evaluated using a continuous improvement cycle for effectiveness and the findings used as a basis for improvement. Fully Met
Course Updates Rating Comments
The course is updated periodically to ensure that the content is current. Fully Met
Certification Rating Comments
Course instructors, whether faceto-face or virtual, are certificated and “highly qualified.” The online course teacher possesses a teaching credential from a state-licensing agency and is “highly qualified” as defined under ESEA. Fully Met
Instructor and Student Support Rating Comments
Professional development about the online course delivery system is offered by the provider to assure effective use of the courseware and various instructional media available. Fully Met
The course provider offers technical support and course management assistance to students, the course instructor, and the school coordinator. Fully Met
Course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, have been provided professional development in the behavioral, social, and when necessary, emotional, aspects of the learning environment. Fully Met
Course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, receive instructor professional development, which includes the support and use of a variety of communication modes to stimulate student engagement online. Fully Met
The provider assures that course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, are provided support, as needed, to ensure their effectiveness and success in meeting the needs of online students. Fully Met
Students are offered an orientation for taking an online course before starting the coursework. Fully Met

Review Conducted By : Genesee ISD
Date of Review : 08/01/2014

Unit 1: Essential Content and Skills

Define various literary terms.
Recognize main ideas, facts, opinions, bias, and author’s purpose to better understand nonfiction texts.
Read a selection to recognize point of view and identify the differences between facts and opinions.
Use a graphic organizer to organize research notes in preparation for writing.
Demonstrate understanding of irregular verbs by completing an activity and checking answers.
Use a graphic organizer to identify main ideas and to connect main ideas between two texts.
Evaluate the research report according to a rubric; revise and submit the report.
Unit 2: Essential Content and Skills

Review the characteristics of persuasive writing and the types of evidence writers use.
Read about the characteristics of a problem-solution essay.
Complete a graphic organizer to identify persuasion and evaluate a writer’s conclusions while reading an article.
Read an article, make assertions about the text, and identify citations to support those assertions.
Complete a graphic organizer to comprehend logical and emotional appeals, evaluate evidence, and identify facts and opinions.
Distinguish word connotations from denotations.
Evaluate the problem-solution essay according to a rubric; revise and submit the essay.
Unit 3: Essential Content and Skills

Review sound effects used in poetry, such as rhythm, meter, rhyme, and repetition.
Review poetic devices that create imagery, such as figurative language, sensory details, metaphor, simile, and personification.
Recognize and identify alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme while reading three poems.
Demonstrate comprehension of haiku conventions by writing a haiku.
Compare and contrast two poems using a graphic organizer.
Evaluate the descriptive essay.
Unit 4: Essential Content and Skills

Analyze the use of dialogue, stage directions, and visualization in drama.
Identify pronouns in the nominative and objective cases.
Recognize the parts of a play’s structure and the uses of suspense and foreshadowing.
Analyze the use of suspense and foreshadowing in dramas.
Review pronouns in the nominative and objective cases, possessive pronouns, contractions, and misplaced modifiers.
Review examples of idioms and identify their use in a reading selection.
Review cause-and-effect text structures to increase comprehension while reading.

Term Type Enrollment Opens Enrollment Ends Random Draw Date Enrollment Drop Date Course Starts Course Ends # of Seats Course Fee Potential Additional Costs
Open Entry / Open Exit 07/01/2019 12/31/2019 100 $150.0000 0.0000
Drop Policy Completion Policy Term Type Enrollment Opens Enrollment Ends
If you notify the National Network of Digital Schools (NNDS) of cancellation within 30 days of the course enrollment date, you will be receive a 100% refund, less the $25.00 activation fee. No refund will be given after 30 days of the enrollment date. Materials purchases are eligible for a refund only when returned unused within 30 days of the date of the original shipment. Enrollments earning 60% or more of the total course points are considered course completions and will be charged the final 20% payment. Open Entry / Open Exit 07/01/2019 12/31/2019

Highly qualified teachers provide students with quality feedback to expand and support content understanding. Students can also utilize email, Teacher Office Hours, Announcements, and Discussion Boards to contact and interact with their teachers.

School Year Enrollment Count Pass Count Completion Rate Notes
14-15 0 0 0.0% None

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