Physical Science B (2nd Semester)

Course Description:

This course is designed to help students understand basic chemical principles and master problem-solving skills. Chemical topics covered in the course include basic science concepts, measurements, atomic theory, bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, acids & bases, and nuclear chemistry.

Course Details:

Course Title (District): Physical Science B (2nd Semester)
Course Title (NCES SCED) : Physical Science
Course Provider : Davison Community Schools
Content Provided By : Davison Community Schools
Online Instructor Provided By : Davison Community Schools
Standards Addressed : CCSS
Academic Terms : Semester
NCES SCED Code :
Subject Area : Life and Physical Sciences
Course Identifier : Physical Science
Course Level : (G) General or Regular
Available Credit : 0.5
Sequence : 1 of 2

How To Enroll:

Email : [email protected]
Phone : 810-591-0672

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Additional Course Information:

C2.2 Molecules in Motion Molecules that compose matter are in constant motion (translational, rotational, vibrational). Energy may be transferred from one object to another during collisions between molecules.
C2.2A Describe conduction in terms of molecules bumping into each other to transfer energy. Explain why there is better conduction in solids and liquids than gases.
C2.2B Describe the various states of matter in terms of the motion and arrangement of the molecules (atoms) making up the substance.
C3.3 Heating Impacts Heating increases the kinetic (translational, rotational, and vibrational) energy of the atoms composing elements and the molecules or ions composing compounds. As the kinetic (translational) energy of the atoms, molecules, or ions increases, the temperature of the matter increases. Heating a sample of a crystalline solid increases the kinetic (vibrational) energy of the atoms, molecules, or ions. When the kinetic (vibrational) energy becomes great enough, the crystalline structure breaks down, and the solid melts.
C3.3A Describe how heat is conducted in a solid.
C3.3B Describe melting on a molecular level.
P4.p1 Kinetic Molecular Theory Properties of solids, liquids, and gases are explained by a model of matter that is composed of tiny particles in motion.
P4.p1A For a substance that can exist in all three phases, describe the relative motion of the particles in each of the phases.
P4.p1B For a substance that can exist in all three phases, make a drawing that shows the arrangement and relative spacing of the particles in each of the phases.
P4.p1C For a simple compound, present a drawing that shows the number of particles in the system does not change as a result of a phase change.
P4.p2 Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures Elements are a class of substances composed of a single kind of atom. Compounds are composed of two or more different elements chemically combined. Mixtures are composed of two or more different elements and/or compounds physically combined. Each element and compound has physical and chemical properties, such as boiling point, density, color, and conductivity, which are independent of the amount of the sample.
P4.p2A Distinguish between an element, compound, or mixture based on drawings or formulae.
P4.p2B Identify a pure substance (element or compound) based on unique chemical and physical properties.
P4.p2C Separate mixtures based on the differences in physical properties of the individual components.
P4.p2D Recognize that the properties of a compound differ from those of its individual elements.
C4.3 Properties of Substances Differences in the physical and chemical properties of substances are explained by the arrangement of the atoms, ions, or molecules of the substances and by the strength of the forces of attraction between the atoms, ions, or molecules.
C4.3A Recognize that substances that are solid at room temperature have stronger attractive forces than liquids at room temperature, which have stronger attractive forces than gases at room temperature.
C4.3B Recognize that solids have a more ordered, regular arrangement of their particles than liquids and that liquids are more ordered than gases.
C4.8 Atomic Structure Electrons, protons, and neutrons are parts of the atom and have measurable properties, including mass and, in the case of protons and electrons, charge. The nuclei of atoms are composed of protons and neutrons. A kind of force that is only evident at nuclear distances holds the particles of the nucleus together against the electrical repulsion between the protons.
C4.8A Identify the location, relative mass, and charge for electrons, protons, and neutrons.
C4.8B Describe the atom as mostly empty space with an extremely small, dense nucleus consisting of the protons and neutrons and an electron cloud surrounding the nucleus.
C4.8C Recognize that protons repel each other and that a strong force needs to be present to keep the nucleus intact.
C4.8D Give the number of electrons and protons present if the fluoride ion has a -1 charge.
C4.9 Periodic Table In the periodic table, elements are arranged in order of increasing number of protons (called the atomic number). Vertical groups in the periodic table (families) have similar physical and chemical properties due to the same outer electron structures.
C4.9A Identify elements with similar chemical and physical properties using the periodic table.
C4.10 Neutral Atoms, Ions, and Isotopes A neutral atom of any element will contain the same number of protons and electrons. Ions are charged particles with an unequal number of protons and electrons. Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons and essentially the same chemical and physical properties.
C4.10A List the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons for any given ion or isotope.
C4.10B Recognize that an element always contains the same number of protons.
C2.5x Nuclear Stability Nuclear stability is related to a decrease in potential energy when the nucleus forms from protons and neutrons. If the neutron/proton ratio is unstable, the element will undergo radioactive decay. The rate of decay is characteristic of each isotope; the time for half the parent nuclei to decay is called the half-life. Comparison of the parent/daughter nuclei can be used to determine the age of a sample. Heavier elements are formed from the fusion of lighter elements in the stars.
C2.5a Determine the age of materials using the ratio of stable and unstable isotopes of a particular type.
C2.r5b Illustrate how elements can change in nuclear reactions using balanced equations. C2.r5c Describe the potential energy changes as two protons approach each other.
C2.r5d Describe how and where all the elements on earth were formed.
C3.5x Mass Defect Nuclear reactions involve energy changes many times the magnitude of chemical changes. In chemical reactions matter is conserved, but in nuclear reactions a small loss in mass (mass defect) will account for the tremendous release of energy. The energy released in nuclear reactions can be calculated from the mass defect using E = mc2.
C3.5a Explain why matter is not conserved in nuclear reactions. C4.8 Atomic Structure Electrons, protons, and neutrons are parts of the atom and have measurable properties, including mass and, in the case of protons and electrons, charge. The nuclei of atoms are composed of protons and neutrons. A kind of force that is only evident at nuclear distances holds the particles of the nucleus together against the electrical repulsion between the protons.
C4.8A Identify the location, relative mass, and charge for electrons, protons, and neutrons.
C4.8B Describe the atom as mostly empty space with an extremely small, dense nucleus consisting of the protons and neutrons and an electron cloud surrounding the nucleus.
C4.8C Recognize that protons repel each other and that a strong force needs to be present to keep the nucleus intact.
C4.8D Give the number of electrons and protons present if the fluoride ion has a -1 charge.
C4.9 Periodic Table In the periodic table, elements are arranged in order of increasing number of protons (called the atomic number). Vertical groups in the periodic table (families) have similar physical and chemical properties due to the same outer electron structures.
C4.9A Identify elements with similar chemical and physical properties using the periodic table.
C5.5 Chemical Bonds — Trends An atom’s electron configuration, particularly of the outermost electrons, determines how the atom can interact with other atoms. The interactions between atoms that hold them together in molecules or between oppositely charged ions are called chemical bonds.
C5.5A Predict if the bonding between two atoms of different elements will be primarily ionic or covalent.
C5.4B Predict the formula for binary compounds of main group elements.
C5.5x Chemical Bonds Chemical bonds can be classified as ionic, covalent, and metallic. The properties of a compound depend on the types of bonds holding the atoms together.
C5.5c Draw Lewis structures for simple compounds.
C5.5d Compare the relative melting point, electrical and thermal conductivity and hardness for ionic, metallic, and covalent compounds.
C5.5e Relate the melting point, hardness, and electrical and thermal conductivity of a substance to its structure.
C4.2 Nomenclature All compounds have unique names that are determined systematically.
C4.2A Name simple binary compounds using their formulae.
C4.2B Given the name, write the formula of simple binary compounds.
C4.2x Nomenclature All molecular and ionic compounds have unique names that are determined systematically.
C4.2c Given a formula, name the compound.
C4.2d Given the name, write the formula of ionic and molecular compounds.
C4.2e Given the formula for a simple hydrocarbon, draw and name the isomers.
C5.2 Chemical Changes Chemical changes can occur when two substances, elements, or compounds interact and produce one or more different substances whose physical and chemical properties are different from the interacting substances. When substances undergo chemical change, the number of atoms in the reactants is the same as the number of atoms in the products. This can be shown through simple balancing of chemical equations. Mass is conserved when substances undergo chemical change. The total mass of the interacting substances (reactants) is the same as the total mass of the substances produced (products).
C5.2A Balance simple chemical equations applying the conservation of matter.
C5.2B Distinguish between chemical and physical changes in terms of the properties of the reactants and products.
C5.2C Draw pictures to distinguish the relationships between atoms in physical and chemical changes.
C5.2x Balancing Equations A balanced chemical equation will allow one to predict the amount of product formed.
C5.2d Calculate the mass of a particular compound formed from the masses of starting materials.
C3.4 Endothermic and Exothermic Reactions Chemical interactions either release energy to the environment (exothermic) or absorb energy from the environment (endothermic).
C3.4A Use the terms endothermic and exothermic correctly to describe chemical reactions in the laboratory.
C3.4B Explain why chemical reactions will either release or absorb energy
C4.7x Solutions The physical properties of a solution are determined by the concentration of solute.
C4.7a Investigate the difference in the boiling point or freezing point of pure water and a salt solution.
C4.7b Compare the density of pure water to that of a sugar solution.
C5.7 Acids and Bases Acids and bases are important classes of chemicals that are recognized by easily observed properties in the laboratory. Acids and bases will neutralize each other. Acid formulas usually begin with hydrogen, and base formulas are a metal with a hydroxide ion. As the pH decreases, a solution becomes more acidic. A difference of one pH unit is a factor of 10 in hydrogen ion concentration.
C5.7A Recognize formulas for common inorganic acids, carboxylic acids, and bases formed from families I and II.
C5.7B Predict products of an acid-base neutralization.
C5.7C Describe tests that can be used to distinguish an acid from a base.
C5.7D Classify various solutions as acidic or basic, given their pH.
C5.7E Explain why lakes with limestone or calcium carbonate experience less adverse effects from acid rain than lakes with granite beds.
C5.8 Carbon Chemistry The chemistry of carbon is important. Carbon atoms can bond to one another in chains, rings, and branching networks to form a variety of structures, including synthetic polymers, oils, and the large molecules essential to life.
C5.8A Draw structural formulas for up to ten carbon chains of simple hydrocarbons.
C5.8B Draw isomers for simple hydrocarbons.
C5.8C Recognize that proteins, starches, and other large biological molecules are polymers.

INACOL Online Course Quality Standards

Academic Content Standards and Assessments Rating Comments
The goals and objectives clearly state what the participants will know or be able to do at the end of the course. The goals and objectives are measurable in multiple ways. Fully Met
The course content and assignments are aligned with the state’s content standards, Common Core curriculum, or other accepted content standards set for Advanced Placement® courses, technology, computer science, or other courses whose content is not included in the state standards. Fully Met
The course content and assignments are of sufficient rigor, depth and breadth to teach the standards being addressed. Fully Met
Information literacy and communication skills are incorporated and taught as an integral part of the curriculum. Fully Met
Multiple learning resources and materials to increase student success are available to students before the course begins. Fully Met
Course Overview and Introduction Rating Comments
Clear, complete course overview and syllabus are included in the course. Fully Met
Course requirements are consistent with course goals, are representative of the scope of the course and are clearly stated. Fully Met
Information is provided to students, parents and mentors on how to communicate with the online instructor and course provider. Fully Met
Legal and Acceptable Use Policies Rating Comments
The course reflects multi-cultural education, and the content is accurate, current and free of bias or advertising. Fully Met
Expectations for academic integrity, use of copyrighted materials, plagiarism and netiquette (Internet etiquette) regarding lesson activities, discussions, and e-mail communications are clearly stated. Fully Met
Privacy policies are clearly stated. Fully Met
Instructor Resources Rating Comments
Online instructor resources and notes are included. Fully Met
Assessment and assignment answers and explanations are included. Fully Met
Instructional and Audience Analysis Rating Comments
Course design reflects a clear understanding of all students’ needs and incorporates varied ways to learn and master the curriculum. Fully Met
Course, Unit and Lesson Design Rating Comments
The course is organized by units and lessons that fall into a logical sequence. Each unit and lesson includes an overview describing objectives, activities, assignments, assessments, and resources to provide multiple learning opportunities for students to master the content. Fully Met
Instructional Strategies and Activities Rating Comments
The course instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning. Fully Met
The course and course instructor provide students with multiple learning paths, based on student needs that engage students in a variety of ways. Fully Met
The course provides opportunities for students to engage in higher-order thinking, critical reasoning activities and thinking in increasingly complex ways. Fully Met
The course provides options for the instructor to adapt learning activities to accommodate students’ needs. Fully Met
Readability levels, written language assignments and mathematical requirements are appropriate for the course content and grade-level expectations. Fully Met
Communication and Interaction Rating Comments
The course design provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student interaction, including opportunities for timely and frequent feedback about student progress. Fully Met
The course design includes explicit communication/activities (both before and during the first week of the course) that confirms whether students are engaged and are progressing through the course. The instructor will follow program guidelines to address non-responsive students. Fully Met
The course provides opportunities for appropriate instructor-student and student-student interaction to foster mastery and application of the material. Fully Met
Resources and Materials Rating Comments
Students have access to resources that enrich the course content. Fully Met
Evaluation Strategies Rating Comments
Student evaluation strategies are consistent with course goals and objectives, are representative of the scope of the course and are clearly stated. Fully Met
The course structure includes adequate and appropriate methods and procedures to assess students’ mastery of content. Fully Met
Feedback Rating Comments
Ongoing, varied, and frequent assessments are conducted throughout the course to inform instruction. Fully Met
Assessment strategies and tools make the student continuously aware of his/her progress in class and mastery of the content. Fully Met
Assessment Resources and Materials Rating Comments
Assessment materials provide the instructor with the flexibility to assess students in a variety of ways. Fully Met
Grading rubrics are provided to the instructor and may be shared with students. Fully Met
The grading policy and practices are easy to understand. Fully Met
Course Architecture Rating Comments
The course architecture permits the online instructor to add content, activities and assessments to extend learning opportunities. Fully Met
The course accommodates multiple school calendars; e.g., block, 4X4 and traditional schedules. Fully Met
User Interface Rating Comments
Clear and consistent navigation is present throughout the course. Fully Met
Rich media are provided in multiple formats for ease of use and access in order to address diverse student needs. Fully Met
Technology Requirements and Interoperability Rating Comments
All technology requirements (including hardware, browser, software, etc...) are specified. Partially Met
Prerequisite skills in the use of technology are identified. Fully Met
The course uses content-specific tools and software appropriately. Fully Met
The course is designed to meet internationally recognized interoperability standards. Partially Met
Copyright and licensing status, including permission to share where applicable, is clearly stated and easily found. Fully Met
Accessibility Rating Comments
Course materials and activities are designed to provide appropriate access to all students. The course, developed with universal design principles in mind, conforms to the U.S. Section 504 and Section 508 provisions for electronic and information technology as well as the W3C’s Web Content Accessibility guidelines (WCAg 2.0). Partially Met
Data Security Rating Comments
Student information remains confidential, as required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Fully Met
Accessing Course Effectiveness Rating Comments
The course provider uses multiple ways of assessing course effectiveness. Fully Met
The course is evaluated using a continuous improvement cycle for effectiveness and the findings used as a basis for improvement. Fully Met
Course Updates Rating Comments
The course is updated periodically to ensure that the content is current. Fully Met
Certification Rating Comments
Course instructors, whether faceto-face or virtual, are certificated and “highly qualified.” The online course teacher possesses a teaching credential from a state-licensing agency and is “highly qualified” as defined under ESEA. Fully Met
Instructor and Student Support Rating Comments
Professional development about the online course delivery system is offered by the provider to assure effective use of the courseware and various instructional media available. Fully Met
The course provider offers technical support and course management assistance to students, the course instructor, and the school coordinator. Fully Met
Course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, have been provided professional development in the behavioral, social, and when necessary, emotional, aspects of the learning environment. Fully Met
Course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, receive instructor professional development, which includes the support and use of a variety of communication modes to stimulate student engagement online. Fully Met
The provider assures that course instructors, whether face-to-face or virtual, are provided support, as needed, to ensure their effectiveness and success in meeting the needs of online students. Fully Met
Students are offered an orientation for taking an online course before starting the coursework. Partially Met

Review Conducted By : Davison Community Schools
Date of Review : 06/28/2017

Classification & Phases of Matter
Properties of Atoms and the Periodic Table
Radioactivity and Nuclear Reactions
Elements and Their Properties
Chemical Bonds
Chemical Reactions
Solutions
Acids, Bases, Salts, and Organic Compounds

Term Type Enrollment Opens Enrollment Ends Random Draw Date Enrollment Drop Date Course Starts Course Ends # of Seats Course Fee Potential Additional Costs
Semester 08/19/2019 09/09/2019 08/19/2019 01/17/2020 30 $300.0000 0.0000
Semester 01/21/2020 02/10/2020 01/21/2020 06/18/2020 32 $300.0000 0.0000
Drop Policy Completion Policy Term Type Enrollment Opens Enrollment Ends
Courses must be dropped by the drop date for the course. Students dropping the course after the drop date will be charged the full fee for the course. Course must be completed by the course end date. Semester 08/19/2019 09/09/2019
Courses must be dropped by the drop date for the course. Students dropping the course after the drop date will be charged the full fee for the course. Course must be completed by the course end date. Semester 01/21/2020 02/10/2020

Messaging me through Schoology is the preferred source of contact. I will do my best to reply within 24 hours. I can also be reached through email at [email protected] as well as by phone at 810-591-3531 ext: 1329

School Year Enrollment Count Pass Count Completion Rate Notes
17-18 2 0 0.0% Smith, Blake
18-19 2 1 50.0%

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